Buddhist Temple of Marin

On this page can be viewed information about our annual Bazaar and semi-annual rummage sales.  Listed here also is information about educational events, lectures,and other special events occurring at the temple.  Please check back regularly to see what's new and what's coming up at the temple.  For schedules see the Calendar page or request a newsletter.  For more information about a particular event call the temple (415) 388-1173 or email us at info@BuddhistTempleOfMarin.org

Annual Events

Rummage Sale -
Rummage sales are held in October and April each year.  You can find great buys on all kinds of things from tools to books, house wares to jewelry, Japanese and other Asian items.  And there is a vast selection of clothes.  The next sale is October 18/19 2014, Saturday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm, Sunday 11:00 am - 3:00 pm.
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Educational Events


Music to Meditate and Self-Reflect

Thursday, March 20th, 7:30
pm
 

Feeling stressed out? The Buddhist Temple of Marin presents “Music to Meditate and Self-Reflect” on Thursday, Mar. 20 at 7:30pm.  Local guest musician Perry Dexter will perform his own style of soothing meditative music.  The event is open to the public, and donations are welcome.
 
A professional vocalist and guitarist, Perry is a student of Tibetan Buddhism, and incorporates chanting and mantras into his music.  With his spiritual music, he hopes to calm the inner nervous system, and draw out the innate clarity and compassion of his listeners.

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Why Buddhism and Why Shin Buddhism in Contemporary America:
Shinjin Awakening, Nembutsu “Meditation”, Amida Buddha, and Pure Land

Buddhists now account for a little over one percent of the U.S. population or about 4 million. If you then add the "Nightstand Buddhists" and those who have been "strongly influenced by Buddhism in regards to spirituality," it would mean that 10% of the people in the U.S. have been impacted by Buddhism. This means that Buddhism has finally entered a Western country on a popular level for the first time in close to 2,600 years of Buddhist history. The seminar will focus on the doctrinal and spiritual qualities of Shin Buddhism with a focus on its controversial "practice" and the nature of Shinjin as well as the teachings of Amida Buddha and Pure Land, which confound both long-time Buddhists and those new to Buddhism. It will be shown that Shin Buddhism lies squarely within the greater Mahayana Buddhist tradition rooted in the Bodhisattva spirit of wisdom and compassion for all beings.   

Saturday, March 29th, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
 

 
A donation of $20 will be collected on the day of the event.

For more information or to register call the temple at (415) 388-1173 or send email to info@BuddhistTempleOfMarin.org.

The temple is located at 390 Miller Avenue in Mill Valley, just north of Whole Foods. 


Instructor biography:
  

Kenneth Kenshin Tanaka was born in 1947 in Yamaguchi, Japan. He moved to California in 1958 with his Nisei parents.  He was introduced to Buddhism at the Mt. View Buddhist Temple, where he attended Sunday school and YBA. After graduating from Stanford in 1970 with a degree in Cultural Anthropology, he entered the M.A. program at Institute of Buddhist Studies to pursue Buddhist studies. In Japan, he studied at Tokyo University where he earned an M.A. in Indian Philosophy, followed by his ordination in 1978 as Jodo Shinshu priest. Returning to the U.S., he spent 8 years at the Univ. of California, Berkeley to earn a Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies.
Dr. Tanaka’s first professional position was at the Inst. of Buddhist Studies, where he spent 11 years, serving much of the time as Assistant Dean and Associate Professor. He then took a leave for 3 years to become the resident minister at the Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church. In 1998, he was appointed professor at Musashino University in Tokyo.
He currently serves as President of two academic associations, 1) the International Association of Shin Buddhist Studies and 2) Japanese Association for the Study of Buddhism and Psychology. He has been an active member of Buddhist-Christian dialogue, currently serving on the board of the Society for Buddhist Christian Studies. He produced and appeared in a weekly year-long Buddhist T.V. program, sponsored by Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai, which was aired in Los Angeles on Sundays in 2005.

Dr. Tanaka's published books include:
1)  The Dawn of Chinese Pure Land Buddhist Doctrine: Ching-ying Hui-yuan’s  Commentary to the Visualization Sutra. (The State Univ. of New York, 1990).
2)  Ocean: An Introduction to Jodo Shinshu Buddhism in America (WisdomOcean  Publication, 1997)
3)  The Faces of Buddhism in America (co-editor) (The Univ. of Calif. Press, 1998)
4)  Pure Land Buddhism: Historical Development and Contemporary Manifestation (Dharmaram College, Bangalore, India, 2004).
5)   American Buddhism: Buddhism Changes, America Changes (Musashino University, 2010) (In Japanese)

  

Past Events


Buddhist Basics, Lead by Catherine Shaw - An in-depth exploration of some of the basic Buddhist principles: Bodhi, wisdom and compassion, impermanence, non-essence, no-self.   
Five Thursdays in January (beginning January 2 and ending January 30, 2014), 7:30 - 9:00 pm 

Registration for this course is required.  
A donation of $40 will be collected at the first class, or $10 per class thereafter.

For more information or to register call the temple at (415) 388-1173 or send email to info@BuddhistTempleOfMarin.org.

Outline:

Class 1, Jan. 2:  Foundations and Principles.
Class 2, Jan. 9:  The Structure of Reality.
Class 3, Jan16:  What To Do About It.
Class 4, Jan 23:  Values, Virtues, Desiderata.
Class 5, Jan. 30:  Bringing It All Back Home; co-taught with
Rev. Ronald Kobata of Buddhist Church of San Francisco.

Instructor biography:
  

Catherine Shaw has been a member of the Buddhist Temple of Marin since 1985.  Her first encounters with Buddhism occurred while she was a high school student in the 1950s, and were from books.  She likes to say (more or less accurately) that it was ten years between when she first decided she was a Buddhist and when she met another one.  In 1974 she discovered (and fell in love with) the academic discipline of Buddhist Studies when she attended the first session of Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colorado.  Returning to the Bay Area, she was fortunate to study Nyingma Buddhism under Lama Gonpa Tseden, Rinpoche.  In the nineties she attended the Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley and completed her Buddhist Studies M.A. degree in 2000.  She loves discussing Buddhadharma with anyone and everyone.


Day-long workshop with Reverend Mark Unno
, Saturday, Ma
y 18, 2013, 9:30 am - 3:00 pm


Great Compassion: The Miracle of Life and Death

The session is open to the public, and cost is $30, which includes lunch.

Rev. Mark Unno, an ordained Shin Buddhist priest, is head of the Dept. of Religious Studies and associate professor of Japanese Buddhism at the University of Oregon in Eugene.  He holds a doctorate in classical Japanese Buddhism from Stanford University, with an emphasis on Shin Buddhism, Shingon and Zen.  He has also worked in the areas of comparative religious thought, Buddhism and psychotherapy and interreligious dialogue.

Rev. Unno is the author of “Shingon Refractions: Myoe and the Mantra of Light” (2004) and editor of “Buddhism and Psychotherapy Across Cultures” (2006).  He lives in Eugene with his wife Megumi and their two cats.

 

Buddhist Basics - A five week course covering the development and spread of Buddhism with emphasis on fundamental Ideas, events, and people

 Five Thursdays in the Spring of 2013 (Beginning March 7
 and ending April 11, 2013), 7:30 - 9:00 pm

Course description:
What are the intellectual currents which have animated Buddhist thought from its inception twenty-five hundred year ago in northern India to today?  In this course we will examine the life and teachings of the historical Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, the development of the Buddhadharma in India and beyond, and how Buddhism has adapted to the various cultures it has encountered in its spread first across Asia and now into the modern world.  We will study how Nagarjuna formulated the Prajna Paramita teachings and how Asanga and Vasabandhu developed Yogacara; how Buddhism left India and became a world religion; and some of the differences between the thoughts, customs, and cultures of the various "Buddhisms" that have resulted.  Registration for this course is required.  A donation of $40 will be collected at the first class, or $10 per class thereafter.

Syllabus:
Week I, March 7:     The life and times of the Buddha:  history, myth, and symbol.

Week II, March 14:  Early Buddhism:  What the Buddha taught, India and Sri Lanka, Asoka, the first written texts.

Week III, March 21: Buddhism becomes a world religion:  Monks, merchants, missionaries, and Maitreya.

Week IV, April 4:      India again:  Nagarjuna, Santedeva, Yogacara and Madyamika, the beginnings of Tantra.

Week V, April 11:     Buddhism in today's world:  Thich Nhat Hahn and Engaged Buddhism, new and old ideas, Buddhism in the West, the current major Buddhist schools.

Instructor biography:
 Catherine Shaw has been a member of the Buddhist Temple of Marin since 1985.  Her first encounters with Buddhism occurred while she was a high school student in the 1950s, and were from books.  She likes to say (more or less accurately) that it was ten years between when she first decided she was a Buddhist and when she met another one.  In 1974 she discovered (and fell in love with) the academic discipline of Buddhist Studies when she attended the first session of Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colorado.  Returning to the Bay Area, she was fortunate to study Nyingma Buddhism under Lama Gonpa Tseden, Rinpoche.  In the nineties she attended the Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley and completed her Buddhist Studies M.A. degree in 2000.  She loves discussing Buddhadharma with anyone and everyone.

 The temple is located at 390 Miller Avenue in Mill Valley, just north of Whole Foods.  For more information or to register call the temple at (415) 388-1173 or send email to info@BuddhistTempleOfMarin.org.

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Evening lecture with Dr. Nobuo Haneda Thursday, Feb 7, 2013, 7:30 - 9:30 pm

Shinran's view of the four types of Buddhism
Theravada’s path of sages, Zen’s immediate enlightenment, Pureland’s post-mortem salvation, and Shin’s experience of Shinjin. Shinran Shonin, the founder of Jodo Shinshu Buddhism, classified all Buddhist traditions into these four types. Why, after many years in the first three did Shinran declare that the fourth path, Shin Buddhism, as the path he would follow to find true fulfillment?


Rev. Dr. Nobuo Haneda was born in Nagano, Japan. He graduated from the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, majoring in Russian. Having come to the U.S.A. in 1971, he received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies at the University of Wisconsin in 1979. Dr. Haneda was a lecturer at the Otani University in Kyoto, Japan, 1979-81, was dean and head professor at the Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley, 1984-85, and was a researcher at the Numata Center in Berkeley, 1987-97.
In 1997 Dr. Haneda helped found the Maida Center of Buddhism in Berkeley, CA, which is a center dedicated to the study of Shin Buddhism in the United States. He is the author of Dharma Breeze: Essays on Shin Buddhism, has translated several Japanese written works on Shin Buddhism, and authors the newsletter “The Dharma Breeze”. He conducts regular study sessions at the Maida Center and annual retreats on topics in Shin Buddhism, and is frequently asked to speak at temples across the country.

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Evening Lecture with John Marmysz PhD, Thursday, January 10, 2013, 7:30 - 9:30 pm

The Buddha in Hollywood
- The ideas articulated by Siddhartha Gautama in the 5th Century BC are truths that extend beyond Buddhism itself
In this talk, Dr. Marmysz will examine a number of contemporary motion pictures in order to demonstrate how ideas basic to Buddhism are also conveyed through popular culture. By scrutinizing films such as Night of the Living Dead, Perfect Sense, The Fountain and The Matrix, we will discover how impermanence, suffering, desire and the aspiration toward enlightenment are common themes in modern film.

John Marmysz received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is the author of The Nihilist’s Notebook (Moralinefree Publishing, 1996), Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism (SUNY Press, 2003), and The Path of Philosophy: Truth, Wonder, and Distress (Wadsworth, forthcoming 2011). He is co-editor (with Scott Lukas) of Fear, Cultural Anxiety and Transformation: Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy Films Remade (Lexington Books, 2009). He currently teaches philosophy at the College of Marin.
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Obon Service and Celebration
Sunday, July 15th 2012, 2:00 - 6:00 pm

Obon is the traditional Buddhist celebration honoring the departed spirits of one's ancestors. Rev. Ronald Kobata will lead the one-hour service will begin at 2:00 pm, followed by Obon Odori, a Japanese style of line dancing. Dancing will last about an hour. Afterward, we will share a Potluck meal together. Bring your favorite dish to share. All are welcome.
The temple is located at 390 Miller Avenue in Mill Valley, just north of Whole Foods. For more information call the temple at (415) 388-1173 or send email to info@BuddhistTempleOfMarin.org.


Ikebana Demonstration
Sunday, June 24th 2012 at 1:30 pm

Renowned instructor Julie Nakatani will lead a demonstration on the art of Ikebana, or traditional Japanese flower-arranging, on Sunday, June 24 at 1:30pm at the Buddhist Temple of Marin. Julie will display arrangements designed by students in her Ikenobo School, as well as offer do-it-yourself kits for sale. The event is free and open to the public.

Julie Nakatani learned the ancient art of Ikebana from her parents, Susumu and Kinsui Saiki. Mr. Saiki was an influential proponent of Japanese art and culture here in the United States. Julie teaches Ikebana throughout the Bay Area.

The temple is located at 390 Miller Avenue in Mill Valley, just north of Whole Foods.


2011/12 Lecture Series

Buddhist Educational Speaker Series - The Buddhist Temple of Marin sponsors lectures and workshops throughout the year.  Below is our current list of offerings.



Reverend Carol Himaka
, Thursday Evenings in September and October, 2011  7:30 - 9:30 pm
Two lecture series of three classes each will occur in the fall, 2011.

All lectures are
Free!  No registration required.

Series one: Introduction to Buddhism
Sept. 29,    Buddha - The history, myth and legend of the man known as The Buddha
Oct.    6 ,    Dharma - The basic Teachings of the Buddha
Oct.   13,    Sangha - The history and background of the original followers of the Buddha.
Series two: Introduction to Jodo Shinshu
Oct.  27,     Bodhisattvas and Pure Lands - Development of Mahayana school and the Bodhisattva spirit
Nov.   3,     Shinran Shonin - The founder of Jodo Shinshu, his contribution to the Pureland Buddhism.
Nov. 10,     What is a Pureland? - Purelands explained and the significance of Amida Buddha's Puredland.
Reverend Carol Himaka was ordained as a Jodo Shinshu minister in 1979 (Kyoto, Japan).  She achieved Kyoshi ordination in 1980 and Kaikyoshi in 1982.  Currently Rev. Himaka is the resident minister at Enmanji Buddhist Temple in Sebastopol, Ca. and the supervising minister at the Buddhist Temple of Marin.  Other assignments include chairman of the Bay District Minister’s Association, Secretary of the BCA Minister’s Association and is an instructor for the correspondence course, Jodo Shinshu level 1, available through the Center for Buddhist Education.  Reverend Himaka was raised in San Diego, California and completed her bachelor of arts degree in Fine Art at San Diego State University.  She also has Master of Arts degrees from the Institute of Buddhist Studies (1979, Buddhist Studies) and California State University at Hayward (1989, English Literature).
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WORKSHOP with Reverend Tetsuo Unno, Saturday, April 7th, 2012, 10:00 am - 3:30 pm.
, $35 donation

Shin Buddhism, Explained Through Western Examples

In an attempt to convey the profundity of Shin Buddhism in a new and vivid way, this seminar looks for help, to a wide range of Western sources - from Franz Kafka, the poet W. B. Yeats, Sigmund Freud, Charles Darwin, and the historian Arnold Toynbee to recent poets such as Denise Levertov or Sara Manguso.  The attendees are encouraged to ask q
uestions which will serve as points of departure for the Rev. Unno's response as well as for the ensuing discussions.

Workshop Schedule:
9:00 - 10:00 am    welcome and sign in
10:00 – NOON    workshop, with a break in the middle if needed
NOON - 1:00 pm    buffet lunch provided by BTM
1:00 - 3:30 pm    workshop, with a break in the middle if needed

Registration is required to attend this event.  To register send an email to info@buddhisttempleofmarin.org or call the temple at (415) 388-1173.  Registration deadline is Monday, April 2, 2012.


Rev. Tetsuo Unno
has taught at Calif State Universities, Northridge and Long Beach (Religious Studies). When invited he continues to lecture at college campuses, as a part of a public lecture series, conferences, or courses related to Buddhism.  As a minister, he has served at the Seattle and Senshin Buddhist Churches; at present, he serves at the Pasadena Buddhist Church on a part-time basis.




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Evening lecture with Dr. Nobuo Haneda  Thursday, Feb 16, 2012, 7:30 - 9:30 pm 

Shakyamuni and Shinran, Buddhism as a Teaching of Self-Examination
Socrates may have coined the term, “The unexamined life is not worth living for a human being” but he may not have been the first. Is this what the Buddha’s message was for the human race? This topic will
be explored by examining the nembutsu teaching of Shinran Shonin, founder of Jodo Shinshu Buddhism.
 

Rev. Dr. Nobuo Haneda was born in Nagano, Japan. He graduated from the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, majoring in Russian. Having come to the U.S.A. in 1971, he received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies at the University of Wisconsin in 1979. Dr. Haneda was a lecturer at the Otani University in Kyoto, Japan, 1979-81, was dean and head professor at the Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley, 1984-85, and was a researcher at the Numata Center in Berkeley, 1987-97.
In 1997 Dr. Haneda helped found the Maida Center of Buddhism in Berkeley, CA, which is a center dedicated to the study of Shin Buddhism in the United States.  He is the author of  Dharma Breeze: Essays on Shin Buddhism,  has translated several Japanese written works on Shin Buddhism, and authors the newsletter “The Dharma Breeze”.  He conducts regular study sessions at the Maida Center and annual retreats on topics in Shin Buddhism, and is frequently asked to speak at temples across the country.
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Buddhist Temple of Marin to host second event in this series on April 16, 7:00 pm

The Marin Interfaith Council's Intra-faith Education Series to be held on the third Monday of March, April, and May.  Each evening will feature a particular religion with speakers addressing the diversity and rich history within one faith tradition.

  • Judaism:  March 19, 7PM, Congregation Kol Shofar, Tiburon
  • Buddhism: April 16, 7PM,  Buddhist Temple of Marin, Mill Valley   
  • Islam:  Monday, May 21, 7PM, Location TBD   
Learn with local leaders, hear fascinating presentations, followed by question and answer about history, traditions, differences and commonalities within a particular religion.




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Evening Lecture with John Marmysz PhD
, Thursday, January 12, 2012  7:30 - 9:30 pm

The Concept of Suffering
    In the Buddha's First Sermon, suffering (dukkha) is identified as one of the Four Noble Truths. Because suffering reveals the nature of our entanglement in the world, it is more than simply a negative phenomenon; it is also discloses reality to us.
    The philosopher Martin Heidegger, in his classic work Being and Time, echoes this insight into the nature of suffering when he identifies anxiety (angst) as a fundamental mode of human attunement to the world.
    This talk will explore the Buddhist concept of suffering (dukkha) and how it compares and contrasts with the idea of anxiety (angst) in Heideggerian philosophy.
- Free! (no registration required)

Recommended Readings:
Anything on the Buddha's first sermon or the Benares Sermon
Being and Time, by Martin Heidegger. Chapter VI, section 40: "The Fundamental Attunement of Angst as the Eminent Disclosedness of Dasein."

John Marmysz received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is the author of The Nihilist’s Notebook (Moralinefree Publishing, 1996), Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism (SUNY Press, 2003), and The Path of Philosophy: Truth, Wonder, and Distress (Wadsworth, forthcoming 2011). He is co-editor (with Scott Lukas) of Fear, Cultural Anxiety and Transformation: Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy Films Remade (Lexington Books, 2009). He currently teaches philosophy at the College of Marin.

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